22
Jan
20

People’s History? conference – programme published

The People’s History? conference website has been updated with details of the programme and papers. The conference will take place at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, on Saturday 15 and Sunday 16 February. The site will be updated periodically as we get closer to the event….

Conference flyer for download

08
Jan
20

Legacy of Empire – Meeting Jan 25th

Legacy of Empire – Meeting Jan 25th

Britain, Zionism and the Creation of Israel

Socialist History Public Meetingbook-400x615

 

Speaker: Dr Gardner Thompson
Red Lion Hall,
Basement, Tresham House, Red Lion Square,
entrance via Lamb’s Conduit Passage by Conway Hall, Holborn, WC1R 4RE

It is now more than seventy years since the creation of the state of Israel, yet its origins and the British Empire’s historic responsibility for Palestine remain little known. Confusion persists too as to the distinction between anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism. In Legacy of Empire, Gardner Thompson offers a clear-eyed review of political Zionism and Britain’s role in shaping the history of Palestine and Israel.

Thompson explores why the British government adopted Zionism in the early twentieth century, issuing the Balfour Declaration in 1917 and then retaining it as the cornerstone of their rule in Palestine after the First World War. Despite evidence and warnings, over the next two decades Britain would facilitate the colonisation of Arab Palestine by Jewish immigrants, ultimately leading to a conflict which it could not contain. Britain’s response was to propose the partition of an ungovernable land: a ‘two-state solution’ which – though endorsed by the United Nations after the Second World War – has so far brought into being neither two states nor a solution.

Gardner Thompson is a historian of British colonialism and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He earned a BA in History from Cambridge University, an MA in East African History and Politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and a PhD on the British Colonial Rule in Uganda from London University. Thompson taught History in Uganda, and then in London where he was Head of the History Department and the Academic Vice-Principal at Dulwich College. His other publications include Governing Uganda: British Colonial Rule and its Legacy and African Democracy: Its Origins and Development in Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania.

26
Nov
19

People’s History? Radical Historiography and the Left in the Twentieth Century – call for papers

Conference on Saturday and Sunday, 15 and 16 February 2020

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

Organised and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History, Chicago.

History has always played a crucial role in the making of the modern left, both in Britain and around the world, providing a vital tool for theoretical rationale, social critique and direct action. Whilst offering an important source of intellectual stimulus, it has equally been the cause of hot debate, controversy and division, never more so than during the twentieth century. Over the course of those ten tumultuous decades, history became the ground upon which the left struggled to define and redefine itself in response to dramatically changing times. Critique was, and continues to be, all-encompassing, from debates on historical interpretation, method, pedagogy and application, to questions addressing the very nature – or possibility – of historical knowledge itself.

This conference seeks to explore all aspects of the status and uses of history in modern left imagination.

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words to be presented at the conference. Conference themes may include, but are not limited to:

History, Marxism and international socialism
History, class and class consciousness
History, philosophy and critical theory
History, gender, race, sexuality
History and (post)colonialism
History and/as activism
History, pedagogy and empowerment
National and international histories
Party histories
History and the role of the historian as public intellectual

For further details and updates please visit the conference website on https://shspeopleshistory.wordpress.com. Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted via the website or by e-mail to the organisers on shspeopleshistory@gmail.com. In view of the UCU industrial action currently underway, the deadline for submitting proposals has been extended to Monday 9 December 2019. We shall inform all applicants as to whether their proposals have been accepted as soon as possible after that date. The deadline for receiving completed papers from successful applicants will be Monday 3 February 2020. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference for both presenters and audience will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance.

 

29
Jan
18

more on the echoes of revolution conference

The first draft version of the conference programme is now online on the conference website. Registration is still open via this link.

14
Dec
17

Echoes of Revolution conference update

There is now a special WordPress site for this event: echoesofrevolution.wordpress.com, where the latest information about this event will be posted.

 

25
Oct
17

1917: The Russian Revolution. New SHS publication

1917 – The Russian Revolution, Reactions and Impact

The Socialist History Society Occasional Publication No. 41

The Russian Revolution of 1917 changed the world forever. For once, it appeared that the oppressed workers were within grasp of the levers of state power and for a while the prospect of permanently ending exploitation seemed a real possibility. The revolutionary mood swept across continents and its impact was felt far beyond the parties of the left and the organised labour movement. The revolution inspired writers, poets, intellectuals and philosophers as much as it did workers and activists. With this special Occasional Publication the Socialist History Society illuminates these momentous events of one hundred years ago with a series of specially written articles that examine the reactions to the revolution in different areas.

Contents 

Evaluating the lessons of October, including their British resonance

by Willie Thompson

Against ‘vacillation, lies and rottenness’: the Russian Revolution and the rift in world socialism

by Francis King

1917’s Several Lenins

by Mike Makin-Waite

‘What they can do in Russia, so can we’: the impact of the Russian Revolutions of 1917 in Germany by Helen Boak

Italy and the Russian Revolution of 1917

by Tobias Abse

Clara Zetkin on the Soviet Experiment, 1917-1934

by John S Partington

Secular Ecstasies and the Revolutionary Women Poets in 1917

by Greta Sykes

Psychoanalysis and Revolution: Sigmund Freud and his circle from fin-de-siècle Vienna to revolutionary Russia

by David Morgan

http://www.socialisthistorysociety.co.uk/

 

03
Oct
17

Call for Papers: Weekend conference – ‘Echoes of revolution 1848, 1918. Revolution, nationalism, and socialism’

As the old European powers approached exhaustion in the Great War, a wave of revolutionary struggles broke out across the continent, from Ireland to Russia. Mass movements articulated class, social and national aspirations as states fragmented and empires, dynasties and rulers were toppled. But relations between these movements and their component parts were anything but simple. National claimants contested for control of disputed territories in the name of self-determination. Class and social movements struggled with one another over who should rule in the successor states, and in whose interests. These struggles left a lasting legacy which helped shape European politics for decades.

 

As a pivotal year in European history, 1918 begs comparison with other pivotal years, in particular 1848, in which many similar social and national aspirations came to the fore. This conference will look at and compare movements for radical social and political change of those revolutionary years. We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words to be presented at the conference on any aspects of revolution, nationalism and socialism anywhere around the world during, around or across the years 1848 and 1918. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance. Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Francis King. E-mail: f.king@uea.ac.uk

Dates: Saturday and Sunday, 17 and 18 February 2018

 

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

 

Organised and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History, Chicago.

 

Deadline for proposals for papers: 15 December 2017

 




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