Archive for the 'Listing' Category



03
Feb
16

Call for Papers: British Communism and Commitment

Day-school, 9th June 2016. Manchester

‘I am not ready to join the party’, wrote the novelist Harold Heslop to leading CPGB party theoretician, Rajani Palme Dutt in 1936, recognising the forbidding level of activism expected.  The mandatory Communist hyper-commitment repelled potential recruits and actual members alike, especially in the early years.  But others who joined the party then and later found through Communist commitment a meaningful way of life and a framework for understanding the world.
Bringing together academics from a wide range of disciplines and former party activists, this day-school analyses the complexities of commitment in the British Communist Party over its seventy-year history (1920-1991).  Papers (20 minutes) might cover, but aren’t restricted to:
•    The motivations and trajectories of party ‘hardliners’ who dutifully observed party discipline and the party line, regardless of misgivings;
•    Communism as a way of life;
•    Expulsion and the fear of it;
•    Autobiographies written by former Communists;
•    Figures who struggled to reconcile vocational, professional or artistic commitments with their Communism;
•    ‘Loyal dissidents’ who remained fundamentally committed to the party while often challenging and seeking to enlarge its assumptions, procedures and priorities;
•    Those who challenged what they saw as dominant party perceptions that ‘race’, gender and sexuality were secondary to class as sites of oppression;
•    Activists who considered their ultimate commitment as being to Communist principles from which they believed the party to have deviated, and who challenged the party on those grounds;
•    Those who transferred their abiding Marxist commitments to different currents or organisations—Trotskyist, New Left, Maoist—and the complex relations with the CPGB that followed.
Part of the AHRC-funded project ‘Wars of Position: Communism and Civil Society’, the day-school will be held in the Reading Room of the Labour History Archive and Study Centre in the People’s History Museum, Manchester, and will include a tour of the CPGB archive holdings.  It will mark the opening to researchers of a new tranche of significant CP archive material relating primarily to the 1950-91 period (the papers of John Attfield, Monty Johnstone and Paul Olive).  The event will conclude with a round-table discussion about Communism, commitment and the archive chaired by Professor Kevin Morgan and featuring Francis King (historian, former CP activist and archivist, editor of Socialist History), and John Attfield (historian and former secretary of the Communist Party History Group).
Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be e-mailed to Ben Harker (ben.harker@manchester.ac.uk) by 1/4/16

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22
May
14

Africa Liberation Day event, Goldsmiths, London 24 May 2014

Africa Liberation Day event, Saturday, 24th May 2014, 2.00 pm – 8.30 pm. Stalls, speakers, music etc.
Goldsmith University, Whitehead Building, Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre, Laurie Grove New Cross, SE14 6NW.
Supported by Caribbean Labour Solidarity and other groups.
Fur further details, see http://www.africanliberationday.net/node/772

12
Apr
14

Call for Papers: Racism and Anti-Racism: from the labour movement to the far-right. A Two-Day Conference to be held at the University of Glasgow, 5-6 September 2014

The first decades of the 21st century have seen two worrying developments for anyone concerned with opposing oppression:
the continuing mutation and expansion of racism into new ‘cultural’ forms, above all in the form of a virulent Islamophobia; and
the electoral consolidation of parties of the far-right, who are not always fascist, but committed to deeply reactionary positions on most social issues, above all in relation to migration.

These two developments are distinct, but overlapping. On the one hand, racism is more widespread than on the far right, institutionally embedded over centuries in even the most notionally liberal states and exerting an influence even in the labour and trade union movement which might be thought to have most to lose from the divisions which it engenders. On the other hand, the far-right almost always includes racism among its repertoire of mobilising issues, but has politics which extend beyond it.

The plenaries and workshop sessions will interrogate:
racism in all its multifarious forms;
the new far-right of the neoliberal era (i.e. mid-1970s onwards), in both its fascist and non-fascist aspects, particularly its growing electoral impact; and
how the different varieties of racism and the far right can be challenged on the ground, and by whom.

Although our focus is international, no conference held in Scotland during September 2014 can avoid the fact of the independence referendum. While the national question is not our subject, any discussion of racism inevitably has to deal with its role in national formation, particularly in the case of the imperial powers of which Britain was once so preeminent. Themes which we hope to address in relation to Scotland are the reality (or otherwise) of claims that it suffers less from racism than England or other areas in Western Europe, and the reasons why, to date, it has remained relatively immune to the electoral appeal of the far-right.

Themes which the conference might address can include, but need not be restricted to the following:

Racism
Racism, class and globalised capitalism
Racism and neoliberalism
State racisms, in particular the racialization of migration and asylum
Anti-Muslim racism and the appropriation and mobilization of feminist discourses
Racism and the ‘white’ working class
Forms of anti-racist activism: from social movements to the everyday
Theorizing contemporary racisms – Feminist, Critical Race Theory, Postcolonial and Neo-Marxist perspectives are particularly welcomed.
The legacy of anti-Irish racism in Scotland
Scots, the Empire and the externalisation of racism
Different attitudes to immigration in Scotland and England

The Far Right
The changing class basis of far right party membership
Distinguishing the ‘non-fascist’ far-right from fascism
Tensions between neoliberalism and far-right policy (the Tea Party, UKIP, etc.)
The far-right and the different phases of capitalist development
Working class electoral support for far-right parties
Campaigning against the far-right
Scottish Loyalism and far-right politics in Scotland
Why is the far-right weaker in Scotland than England?

We invite proposals for individual papers or panels from both established academics and postgraduate students, but also from those involved in addressing racism on a practical basis in advocacy groups, community campaigns, anti-racist mobilisations and trade unions.

Proposals should be no longer than 250 words and submitted to both organisers:
neil.davidson@glasgow.ac.uk and satnam.virdee@glasgow.ac.uk
by 16 May 2014

We are grateful to the Centre for Dynamics on Ethnicity (CoDE) and Sociology at the University of Glasgow for providing financial support for the organization of the conference.

21
May
13

Symposium on Class, Identity and Immigration, University of Reading, 26th September 2013

In conjunction with the University of Reading and Socialist History, this symposium will examine communal and radical politics in the turn of the century East End of London, particularly focusing on the Jewish and Irish immigrant communities, through discussion of political, social, and comparative history, faith and minority culture. The speakers, from a variety of academic backgrounds, will provide fresh insight into the nature of identity and how it is shaped, both in the turn of the century East End and today.
With the recent statistics on the profound shift that has taken place over the last decade in the demographic make-up of London, and the political controversies over renewed immigration from Eastern Europe in to Britain, the question of minority ethnic identification and involvement in politics is as relevant as it was at the turn of the twentieth century. How the contemporary political Left should address these issues, and the viability of grass roots radical politics in minority communities, is a question beyond the remit of these papers. However, the arguments on class, immigration and identity in the late-Victorian and Edwardian period, presented here, approached from different disciplines and standpoints, and encompassing and utilising music, theatre, and poetry, may perhaps help to clarify the challenges faced today.
The following papers will be given:
‘Morris Winchevsky’s London Years: The New Poetry of Jewish Socialism, 1884-94’ – Vivi Lachs (Royal Holloway)
‘Control, Cohesion and Faith: A Comparative Discussion of Immigrant Communal Control in the Fin-de-siècle East End’ – Daniel Renshaw (University of Reading)
‘Irish Catholic Religious Processions in Early Twentieth Century East London’ – Giulia Ni Dhulchaointigh (Trinity College Dublin)
Towards a Cosmopolitan Account of Jewish Socialism: Class, Identity and Immigration in Edwardian London’ – Dr Ben Gidley (COMPAS, University of Oxford)
‘” England People Very Nice”: Multi-Generational Irish Identities in the Multi-Cultural East End’ – Emeritus Professor Bronwen Walter (Anglia Ruskin University)
The symposium is to be held in Old Whiteknights House, at the University of Reading on Thursday 26th September 2013, with registration at 12 midday. Lunch will be provided. All are welcome, but please register as places are limited. If you are interested in attending or wish to find out more please email D.G.W.Renshaw@pgr.reading.ac.uk for further details.

10
May
13

Call for papers:- Conference: “Workers’ Internationalism before 1914”

Conference: “Workers’ Internationalism before 1914”
15-16 February 2014, School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

Call for papers

2014 is the 150th anniversary of the foundation of the International Working Men’s Association in 1864. It is also the 125th anniversary of the foundation of the Socialist International in 1889, and the centenary of the outbreak of the war which precipitated the collapse of that International.

To mark these anniversaries, UEA School of History, in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History (Chicago) are organising a conference on “Workers’ internationalism before 1914”. We are inviting proposals for papers on any aspect of the subject.

Themes might include:
• the historical experience of the internationals and their affiliated organisations
• cross-border labour organisation
• resistance to nationalist politics in multi-national states
• transnational and international solidarity
• migration and the transplantation of labour movement culture
• international causes celèbres
• political asylum and revolutionary exile
• speaking tours of socialist leaders

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words on various experiences or aspects of workers’ internationalism before 1914, to be presented at the seminar. Selected papers will be published in 2014 in a special issue of Socialist History devoted to the subject.

Enquiries and proposals for papers should be submitted by 1 October 2013 to internationalism1914@gmail.com. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge.

31
Jul
12

Book Launch: Caribbean Workers’ Struggles by Richard Hart – postponed!

This event has been postponed, regrettably, owing to insufficient time. It will be rearranged later. Watch this space for announcements; apologies for any inconvenience or disappointment.

16
Apr
12

Socialist History talk in Derry, 21.4.2012

Kevin Morgan speaks on Empire, internationalism and the ambiguities of trade-union unity: A.A. Purcell, the Furnishing Trades and the case of Ireland. Saturday 21 April 2012. Time: 11.30 a.m. Venue: Room MD050, Magee Campus, University of Ulster, Northlands Road, Derry, Londonderry, BT48 7JL. 




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